Posts Tagged ‘personal accountability

31
Mar
15

x marks the spot

Why do so many people try to hold us back from moving forward in our lives? Didn’t we all learn early in life that we should celebrate the successes of others and strive to emulate them? According to Theory Y believers everyone wants to live a life of purpose and reach their greater levels of joy, peace, energy, and prosperity. Yet how can they possibly do that if their every waking moment is spent obstructing, impeding, slowing, slandering, or demotivating others? Their cup of hostility and insecurity runneth over and they work to slather and sling it on as many as people possible.

Chuck Reeves, author of Journal of a Climberhaters, stated, “Successful people do not resent successful people. Unsuccessful people do.” Boom! There it is. In today’s technologically superior yet higher-order-thinking deficient society, we are obsessed by spewing out judgments and pious pontifications. It’s always been there since the dawn of mankind, but the sheer volume and saturation of it in today’s world does not bode well for the up and coming would be leaders. By disparaging when we should be debating and turning teachable moments into bloody massacres, we are encouraging people to kill rather than to query.

We’re so busy hating the oppressor du jour that we forget life’s what we make it. Who cares who gets the credit? Miserable, thumb-sucking, complaining, griping boneheads, that’s who. As Zig Ziglar said, “You will get all you want in life if you help enough other people get what they want.” So why is it so hard to see that, ipso facto, the opposite is true? “You will get nothing you want in life if you impede other people getting what they want.” Of noticeable absence is the presence of any higher-order thinking skills. Resentment, jealousy, envy; whatever you call it it’s one of the seven deadly sins. Yet somehow we feed ourselves a steady diet of it in today’s society.

Thus proveth the Theory X that people are lazy, cynical and would rather complain than attain. What to do about it? Model a more proactive approach. In all your communications, be proclamatory, not accusatory. Be an extorter, not a retorter; and finally, be a relater, not a hater. I worry about those whose existence is spent seething at the successes of others. Successful people should always inspire us to greater heights, and if that is not the response you have in your heart when others tell you of their good fortune, you might want to take a tough, long look at what’s going on inside of you. There is no suck in success!

11
Feb
13

I Hate My Job

hate-my-job1Give the world the best you have and you’ll get kicked in the teeth.
Give the world the best you have anyway.”
― Kent M. Keith

So you hate your job. Of course you do! How do I know? It’s the nature of the beast. There’s a reason for it. My father, the late Charlie “Tremendous” Jones, said “God never made a job that would make a man, but he made any man who could make a job.” This is a scary statement because it puts the burden squarely on the shoulders of the individual and not on the company, boss, or co-workers. Was my father saying that if I hate my job what I’m really saying is that I hate myself??

No job is worthy of anything. It’s just a title, a line on a P&L sheet, a job description, but what makes it come alive and have value is you. So if you hate your job, let’s be honest. It’s simply that you just don’t care enough to make it come alive. The workforce is filled to the brim with employees billing 40 hours of bitching and cyberloafing. The cost of disengagement is staggering.

How do I know this? I’ve worked alongside—and even worked for—many people who hated their jobs. I knew this because of the way they sloughed off dealing with problems, trying to build succession plans, and spending most of their time building silos to protect their turf and friends or family members. If they loved their job, they would have been man or woman enough to actually make it.

Growing up in various career fields, I remember asking my father why I continually found that the harder I worked the more people within the organization seemed to work against me. He said, “You can either work for someone else, or you can work for yourself. But as long as you work for someone else, this will always happen.”  Oh no!!! Again with putting the responsibility for my professional happiness squarely on me!!

Your job has nothing to do with your idiotic boss, or the lame process-improvement team you just got assigned to. You can’t get anything out of any job. You can only put things into it. It’s all about what you can bring to it. There will never be a job or a boss or a title that truly credits, sees, and reflects all that you do. Work is about growing and giving back, not about what you can get out of it. It’s meant for you to grow, and take risks, and be thrown under the bus, and get back up! Man, that’s tough! No wonder we hate it!

In some countries, workers don’t get the choice to decide where they want to work. In America, we do. This Right to Work comes with the rejection of victimization, and the embracing of the personal responsibility for one’s own state in life, and that goes for professional, not just personal. My father also said, “The best way to get a better job is to do a better job.” If we are serious about growing and giving back, we will always strive to do a better job because it’s the right thing to do. And if you get to the point where you are not able to do, or actually get penalized for doing, the right thing, it’s essential that you move on to a job where you can.

27
Dec
12

Are you Slacktose Intolerant?

dilbert-slackerOffer the lazy an egg, and they’ll want you to peel it for them.

– A Proverb

Slacktose intolerance, also called loser phobia and hypomalaisa, is the inability to digest poor performance, lack of initiative, and failure to accept responsibility. Slacktose-intolerant individuals have insufficient levels of desire to digest those who display repeated bouts of negativity, an inability to digest any amount of responsibility avoidance, and suffer from chronic aversion to thumb sucking. Symptoms include disgust, irritable bowel syndrome, and even the primal fight-or-flight instinct in those with a heightened sensitivity.

Recommended treatments include speaking to the infected individual regarding their condition. If they do not seek immediate aid they are to be removed from your world. The Centers for Disease Control should start including laziness in their list of highly infectious-diseases due to the amount of damage slackers can do to an entire organization. The good news is, once the affected area has been cut out, recovery rates are 100 percent!

I can remember hearing the late, great Zig Ziglar say, “Are you a SNIOP? Someone who is Sensitive to the Negative Influence of Others?” Why, yes I am!! That described me to a “T”! I am a flexible, easy going person, but when faced with lazy or indecisive individuals my righteous indignation meter gets pegged! I am sensitive to the influence of negative and lazy people! In fact, I am so highly allergic that I suffer violent reactions! Charles Horace Mayo, co-founder of the Mayo clinic said, “You must avoid sloth, that wicked siren.” Amen brother, even the medical field recognized that laziness is a horrible disease!

It’s a universal truth: if you are unwilling to learn to help yourself, how on earth am I going to help you? In the world of psychology, it’s called “enabling”, i.e., doing things for people that they could or should do for themselves. This can happen in both our professional and personal worlds and is a recipe for disaster. Nothing good ever comes of this, not in a million years. Once you accept there is no cure for the afflicted you can lay off taking guilt trips and the repetitive rationalizations. They simply must heal themselves.

An organization that is slacktose tolerant suffers from weak management. A relationship that is slacktose tolerant suffers from enabling behavior. In each case the person provides excuses or otherwise makes it possible to avoid the consequences of such behavior through the sound of silence, i.e., indifference.

The greatest battle is the one within the self so stop trying to “fix” other people’s issues by allowing their type of behavior to continue to manifest itself. Don’t refuse to take action for fear of their angry response to you cutting them off and out. And be proud when they call you intolerant and self-righteous because that’s exactly what you are; slacktose intolerant with a supreme respect for the power of the individual self to control their own destiny. There is not going to be any meeting of the minds. But then again, you already knew that. Saint-John Perse said, “The only menace is inertia” and that’s one menace we can all take immediate action to avoid.

14
Nov
12

TremendoCare: Health care for your head

Recent studies claim that one in four Americans suffers from depression.  Don’t let your body catch a disease of the mind! It’s a well-known fact that as a man thinketh, so he is. If you are addicted to complacency and suffer from delusions of non-accountability, we have the inoculation, vaccination and preventive care that you can’t afford to be without!

Read! Read life-transforming books as if your life depends on it, because it literally does. There are multitudes of example where a positive mindset conquered all, even physical and mental illness.

Coverage is ten dollars per person per month. You can never lose coverage and we encourage, even specialize, in pre-existing conditions!! We even have a cure for cancerous attitudes, thumbsuckitis, and failure-phobia.

Forget marijuana, let’s legalize LSD: Leadership, Service and Dedication! Take a trip you’ll never forget! Users experience bouts of euphoria, a rapid succession of epiphanies, and a chronic need to make the world a better place. Negative side effects include possible paper cuts as a result of rapid page turning.

We are pro-life—a tremendous one; AND pro-choice—wise ones.  Parental consent not required. They’ve been waiting for you to enroll your entire life!

This will not raise your taxes; however, it will most likely put you in a higher tax bracket. One-hundred-percent guarantee that in five years you will be a completely different person or your money back!

A book a day keeps the doctor away. The Bookmaster General recommends spending a minimum of 15 minutes a day reading material that will induce prolonged periods of thought to stave off hardening of the heart and moral decay.

Contact us to enroll in TremendoCare today!

11
Oct
12

When Your Best Isn’t Good Enough

There are times in everyone’s life when we cannot get to the end goal we desire despite how much effort, hope, or prayer we apply. One of the keys to a successful life, not only for you but for those underneath your influence or command, is to know when to step aside. This is a great reflection of true leadership but it is too often unrecognized.

Let’s face it. We all are endowed with specific gifts and abilities that no two have alike. That means that you will do certain things better than others and others will do certain things more effectively than you. This should not threaten a leader who is focused on the end goal. It’s the old cliché, “It’s amazing what you can get done when you don’t care who gets the credit.”

On the news, I recently heard someone in a position of great authority reply, in response to a question, “We are doing the best we can.” While we certainly encourage this type of language among children to encourage them to truly do their personal best and to develop self esteem, this verbiage has no place in a leader’s vocabulary.

When I attended the Air Force Academy in the mid-80s, first-year cadets were allowed only five basic responses when asked a question by an upperclassman. They were “Yes, sir/ma’am”; “No, sir/ma’am”; “No excuse, sir/ma’am”; “Sir/Ma’am, I do not know”; “Sir, Ma’am, I will find out”. That’s it! No more, no less. This first year of only answering with these responses stick with me to this day. It’s probably why, when someone answers me with an excuse, I feel a tremendous urge to tell them to drop and give me twenty! The service academies are first and foremost leadership academies. After all, you cannot defend against all enemies, foreign and domestic, if you are not a leader. And that is the primary job of a leader, to take care of those under their care.

Had I ever answered “I’m doing my best” as a cadet, I’m sure I would have been drummed out of the corps, and rightly so. Had I ever answered “I’m doing my best” to a Fortune 500 customer when they asked why their five-million-dollar piece of equipment wasn’t ready, I’m sure I would have been fired, and rightly so. If, when running a classified project, I replied “I’m doing my best” when asked why there were documented security violations, I’m sure I would have been escorted off base, and should have been.

If you have truly done your best and still cannot get the job done, do not let your ego sink all the good things you’ve accomplished. Realize it is time to move on to the next area requiring your particular set of talents and let the next team come in. That’s why we have succession plans and it’s why no one, no matter how smart or how powerful, is ever indispensible. Do not ever say, “I’m doing the best I can” because that is never an answer that serves any purpose other than making an excuse for yourself and alienating or infuriating the questioner.

04
Oct
12

Work ethic or wish ethic?

Two construction workers sat down to eat their lunches one day. One worker opened his lunch box, took out the sandwich, and exclaimed, “Oh no, not peanut-butter sandwiches!!” The next day the same scenario was repeated. This went on for several more days before his co-worker finally said, “Joe, if you don’t like peanut-butter sandwiches, just tell you wife not to pack them anymore!” His friend immediately fired back, “You leave my wife out of this! I pack my own lunch!!”

Which is stronger: your work ethic or your wish ethic? One of the great universal and constant truths is the role of hard work in living your life to its fullest potential. Yet somehow, despite the plethora of stories we hear about how our parents and predecessors worked so hard, many feel that it is somehow beneath them to struggle for success today. They’ll use all kinds of excuses such as the opportunities are not there (where’d they go?), life’s not fair (who said it was?), and cast stones at those who have what they do not in an attempt to tear them down (the blame game).

My grandfather had five children within five years in the heart of the Depression, but no job. That didn’t stop him from working. There are countless studies about the impact of having meaningful work and how it affects your self esteem. If you have a work ethic, you will find work because it’s in your blood. I am constantly looking for people who are able to bring a strong sense of accountability and commitment to our organization. I can and always will have a place for them.

How badly do you really want to succeed? Enough to ignite an internal revival? Or are you content to languish in the mode of survival? Life will always be one continuous, glorious pageant of struggles. That’s the nature of it. It’s like the Samuel Goldwyn quote, “The harder I work, the luckier I get”. Wishing is child’s play. What do we wish upon? A falling star? A birthday candle? It’s a tradition, but it doesn’t actually mean anything.

Never forget, those at the top of the mountain didn’t fall there. Even if you are born with certain privileges, if you don’t work to keep them they won’t always be there.  Money can’t buy a work ethic. It is something you develop internally.  The government can’t subsidize one for you; quite the contrary: any help received that does not help you to develop your work ethic is injurious. As my father, Charlie “Tremendous” Jones used to say, “It takes a lot of learning to figure out how to help somebody more by hindering them less. Imagine what will happen if Congress ever figures that out.”

It reminds me of the classic Blues Brothers song, “Rubber Biscuit”:

“Have you ever heard of a wish sandwich? A wish sandwich is the kind of a sandwich where you have two slices of bread and you wish you had some meat…”

So what are you packing in your lunchbox? Are you wishing for something? Or are you working to get some prime cuts into the bread box of your life?

25
Oct
11

occupy your own street

Everything man has ever thought of or laid a finger on is corrupt. It’s just a reflection of our nature. And I’m sorry Star Trek: The Next Generation, I love you but we are not evolving to a higher social consciousness where everyone, regardless of gender, is called “Sir”. The laws of human nature just aren’t set up like that. Every company, organization, or bureaucracy I’ve ever worked for had illegal, immoral or unethical elements. That’s because they are made up of people and absolute power corrupts absolutely. That never stopped me from doing my best and working in all different kinds of industries where I learned a great deal. When they got to a point where I felt I could no longer give my 110% support due to some kind of ethical, financial, or legal lapse I witnessed, I left.

A great many people are fuming about the lack of work. Growing up in my house, the lack of a job was never any excuse not to work. In his Key to Excellence speech, Charlie “Tremendous” Jones had this to say: “You say, “What if I don’t have a job?” You work anyway. You say you can’t work without a job. Don’t you tell me that!  My father raised five of us in the depression with no mother years ago when there was no work. He worked. And you know you can’t live without breathing. Well, you can’t live right without working. It’s life. Work.”

I’m an independent publisher who’s made the business decision to partner with other small businesses worldwide and give all profits away as part of our Foundation. They go to scholarships, homeless shelters and missions groups. That’s just how I do it because that’s where our convictions lie, not because someone protested that I do so. And I don’t concern myself with other business owners who don’t see things through my philanthropic-colored glasses. It’s their business, their life, their conscience, and even if I could prove them “wrong” in some way, what good does that do?

Norman Vincent Peale said it best: “Empty pockets never held anyone back. Only empty heads and empty hearts can do that.” And of course I wouldn’t be worth a hill of beans unless I recommended two books that illustrate that giving something to someone for free condemns them to a life of insatiable want. 8 Attributes of Great Achievers , by Cameron C. Taylor, has an amazing chapter on wealth and whether it can be created or if there is a finite amount which must constantly be redistributed. And then there’s our best seller, “The Ultimate Gift”, where a poor man works tirelessly to gain tremendous wealth, bestows it all freely on his family, and ruins them in the process.

I found an old book published in 1914 on my father’s bookshelf the other week by Maurice Switzer titled, “Letters of a Self-Made Failure.” The opening illustration shows a man at a deli counter with the inscription, “You can take it from me that a ham sandwich paid for out of your hard-earned cash is a lot more enjoyable than a free ten-course banquet at the swellest hotel in town.”  So quit stressing about who did what to whom and focus on yourself. Corruption is a fact of life; all you can do is make sure you refuse to be any part of it and that your own street is spic-and-span and accessible to all.




Tremendous Tracey


CEO Tremendous Life Books. Book Evangelist

Join Me On:

March 2017
M T W T F S S
« Jul    
 12345
6789101112
13141516171819
20212223242526
2728293031  

%d bloggers like this: