Posts Tagged ‘father’s day

13
Jun
14

Father Knows Best: Top Ten Tremendous Tips

DadTinceMy father was a humorist and a motivator whose outlook on life was exuberant beyond description, yet he was also one of the most pragmatic, contrarian thinkers I have ever encountered. With his wit and wisdom, he had a way of putting my angst and complaining in check in just a few, well-chosen words. This Father’s Day, I pay tribute to the top ten Tremendousisms he shared with me over the years. To this day I can still hear him saying these!

 

On Finding the Right Man: Find something with pants on and pray!

On Quitting: You can’t quit; you ain’t done nothin’ yet!

On Self-Pity: Is what you’re going through any worse than what Jesus suffered?

On Disliking Your Boss: You can either work for yourself or you can work for someone else. As long as you work for someone else, this will always happen.

On Asking “Why Me?”: Things go wrong for you so that you can be a blessing to someone in the future when they are going through the same thing. This isn’t about you!

On Cold Calling: If you can knock on a door and make a sale, you can do anything in life.

On Keeping the Customer’s Interest: Put your head through the door, not your foot. That way you can keep on talking when they go to close the door on you.

On Making Decisions: Make it, Make it yours, die by it.

On Expectations: Expect everything to go wrong; that way, when things don’t, you are pleasantly surprised!

On What’s Important in Life: In all your life you’ll only make three truly important decisions: Who will you live your life with? What will you live your life doing? Who will you live your life for?

13
Jun
13

Avoid the Clichés this Father’s Day

TinceDadAlthough known for being a world class comedian, my father was the consummate pragmatist. His ability to blend the bitter with the sweet echoed in many people’s hearts because that’s truly the essence of life. While some fathers raised their daughters by consistently heaping praise on them about how beautiful they were and how they could become anything they wanted, I received much more practical advice. Here’s the best of the best!

Earn Your Stripes! Dad used to tell the story about the young salesman who asked the old-timer how he had managed to be so successful. The old-timer replied “Good Judgment”. The young man then asked, “Well, how do you get good judgment?” The old-timer replied, “Experience”. The young man, eager to learn all he could, pressed on, “Well, how do you get experience?” To which the old man replied, “Poor judgment.” The road to success entails a lot of required failures. The only way to get promoted through the ranks is to do the grunt work.

Be Happy Miserable! I learned much while traveling to meetings with my LilTincefather.  There was a recurring routine we used to do while I was still little enough for him to hold me in his arms. At the end of a speech he’d call me up on stage and say, “Tracey, how are you?” And I’d say “Tremendous!” And then he’d ask, “How are things going?” And I’d say, “I hope things don’t get any better!” and he’d say “Why?” And I’d exclaim “Because I’m so tired of being happy it’s wearing me out!!!” Life’s tough; it’s tougher if you don’t have a positive attitude.

Quit Thumb-Sucking! When I would call my father lamenting about the nonsense I had to endure at my job he’d interrupt “You can either work for someone else, or you can work for yourself. As long as someone else is your boss, this will always happen.” The second thing he would say when I would angst over how hurtful the slander, the betrayal, and malice, was “Do you think that what you are going through is a fraction of the pain and suffering Christ endured?” Followed up by the ever popular, “You’re never a failure until you blame somebody else!”

It’s Not About You! Two things I heard over and over again growing up really helped me avoid showing up at my own pity party. First, my Dad used to say, “Things don’t go wrong and break your heart so you can become bitter and give up. They happen to break you down and build you up so you can be all that you were intended to be.” So how could I bellyache about a trial or tribulation that was actually the fire designed to forge me into something stronger?

So what kind of a father did you have? With the alarming rate of absentee fathers, it makes me think about all of the girls who won’t get the chance to even interact with their fathers. Whether you’re a laid-back nurturer or a “tough love” kind of dad matters not. What’s important is that you impart your wisdom and presence. Because believe me, it makes all the difference in the world.

 

14
Jun
12

the father i never knew

My father, the late Charlie “Tremendous” Jones, said that he knew Abraham Lincoln better than Lincoln’s own mother. He made this bold statement due to the amount of material he read that Lincoln himself had written. I thought this comment was a bit exaggerated (how could anyone know anyone better than their own mother?) until I found myself in a similar situation.

I traveled extensively with my father growing up. He took me with him on his business trips whenever possible and throughout summer breaks from school.  He was 36 years old when I was born so he had made his mark in the insurance industry and was off on his own as an entrepreneur publishing and motivating. At 18, I left central PA for 28 years to see the world and find my own place in it. During the decades I lived away from home I saw my father at meetings, over the holidays, in print, or on video.  I knew he was successful at what he did, but I was off to earn my own stripes.

 I returned in 2009, three months after my father had triumphantly entered the gates of heaven, to pick up where he had left off. Since then, I have had the poignant pleasure of going through every note, piece of paper, doodle, airline ticket, and journal he had ever written. To say I know my father in a whole new light is an understatement. My father always loved the written word because he said it had no tone and passed no judgment. You took from it what you needed to hear.  It spoke to your heart whereas people had a tendency to speak to your ear.

The same is true as I go through his mountains of material. There’s nothing he hadn’t said to me in person, but now I get to read it for myself without any childhood moods, teen angst, or adult drama. As I sift through the piles I see how he hustled to get his speaking career off the ground, often speaking for free or to very small audiences. I see first-hand how he would always look for local churches, schools, and prisons wherever he traveled so he could go there after his paid speech was completed. I see how he met each and every person before and after each speaking engagement to thank them for their smile and to give them a hug.

He worked so hard. He dealt with so much rejection. He was such an encourager to so many people. He was so authentic. He was diagnosed with prostate cancer in 1999, when he was 70 years old, but that didn’t stop him from living the next 10 years at a pace and with a passion not previously seen. I remember him telling me that the 70’s were the best years of his life. And there again I was sifting though letters, and articles, and speeches all validating exactly what he told me.

He pushed until his last breath. He ran the race like I could not imagine someone would. I know this because I saw his last written letters scribbled from his hospice bed.

I am so glad I got the chance to know my father in a way I never had before. I finally understand so much of the father/daughter dynamic and what he was trying to do with his life through the business. And although I miss him desperately each day, the fact that I get to read about him over and over again as I go through his material makes it seem like he’s not even gone.

On this Father’s Day, for those of you whose fathers have passed on, there’s still the chance to get to know them in a way you never did before. I can honestly say that I know my father better now than when he was living.

16
Jun
11

how to create the most memorable father’s day gift ever

I’ll never forget the thrill I got when I read a book filled with tremendous truths that were completely opposite to what I had believed. The books began to change my life and the lives of my friends and associates. Then I realized I had overlooked the most important people in my life: my family. My oldest son, Jere, was 14 years old at the time. He was the perfect example of the modern teenager. He never did anything wrong; he never did anything right; he just never did anything!

I—like most dads—have been critical of the way they do things inWashington, but one day I realized I was running a worse program in my home than the politicians in government. I decided it was time for a change, and since books had been so tremendously helpful in my life I decided to use them with my son.

I knew Jere would rebel against my forcing him to read so I planned some strategy. You know, you can take a horse to water, but you can’t make him drink—well, I decided to put some salt in Jere’s oats and make him thirsty.

“Jere, in two years you’re going to want me to help you buy a car, and I want to help you. But I’m not going to give you the money. Here is my proposal. I’m going to pay you $10 for every book you read. I’ll pick the book, you give me a written report, and I’ll put $10 in a car fund. So, if you read in style, you’ll drive in style. But if you read like a bum, you’ll drive like a bum.” Overnight he developed a tremendous hunger for reading!

My heart aches for the boy whose dad sends him off for an education before teaching him a little of the why and how of living.

Jere went to college and made a habit of writing a “Dear Dad” postcard every day about a new idea that had hit him, or a fresh slant on an old idea. And these ideas have come from his reading. I can tell you the very page of the book that I paid him to read which inspired some of these tremendous ideas!

Excerpt from “Life Is Tremendous” by Charlie “Tremendous” Jones.  For more information on Charlie’s reading contract and Jere’s “Dear Dad” cards, read this motivational classic available at www.TremendousLifeBooks.com




Tremendous Tracey


CEO Tremendous Life Books. Book Evangelist

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