Posts Tagged ‘decisions

05
Mar
13

chicken little leadership

0923_ChickenLittle_New_UFSGRAYTrue leaders love a crisis. It gives them the chance to go through the fires and be molded into something stronger and more powerful. The masses love to rally around a leader who lays out a clear vision of how to tackle the problem at hand. At least that’s the way it’s supposed to work. I’ve worked for some leaders who do just the opposite. They wring their hands and bemoan the challenges and problems they’ve inherited. I remember thinking, “Dear God, why’d you take this job then?” and “Isn’t that why you’re getting paid so much?”

There will always be problems and seemingly unsolvable crises. Welcome to life and being in charge! But Hell holds a special place for “leaders” who “lead” by manufactured crisis. Paralysis justified by fear mongering gets old; make a decision already! When you keep raising the issue again and again and again with no concrete actions to address the problem, it’s insanity. We want action plans from our leaders at the top. Everyone knows that when mid-level managers try to solve an issue NOTHING happens without the commitment and leadership of the person at the very top.

I’ve addressed this very phenomenon in several organizations. When I was a Commander in the Air Force I had a fellow Commander who wanted to utilize our limited resources from a tactical approach whereas I had to consider the overall strategic implications. We tried to work this out, but were coming at the solution from two very different perspectives. The impasse went on for months and the wing leadership did nothing to resolve the conflict.

I did everything I could within my authority and the regulations to deal with the problem but because I was not the one running the show, the ultimate direction of resources was not up to me. But there does come a time when going off the cliff is the only way to draw attention to an issue and a decision. In fact, several of the organizations I left had the wheels fall off their train before any action was taken. I, like most people, don’t deal well with people in ultimate positions of authority who won’t make decisions.

Leaders are supposed to turn crises into opportunities, not run around screaming “the sky is falling” or crying wolf. Working to gain consensus is okay but, in the end, the leader has to make the decision, make it theirs, and then live and die by it. 

27
Sep
11

coming home

This past week I’ve had the rare opportunity to travel back to each of the towns that has meant something special to me. I’m on a book tour with my dog and we cleverly chose places that we previously lived in to launch the book. Pulling into each town is always exciting. You get to see what’s changed and what stayed the same. What highways and tollways have been incorporated to sustain the growth. What happened to your old neighborhood. It’s always “iffy” returning to the past because things are never the same. Past flames never feel the same, some of the neighbors are gone, and your house may be painted a different color or torn down altogether.

The other thing you get to see is your true friends. These are the ones who would drive clear across town in rush hour traffic to help you celebrate your first book release. Absent are the ones who feigned concern when you were the boss, or could only relate to you when you were a member of the work pack. Things do change, but true friends don’t. It’s always good to separate the wheat from the chaff repeatedly in your life so you know whom to focus your attention, time and prayers on.

I am not running the largest organization I ever have at this time in my career. It’s a small independent publishing company. It’s a lean, tight workforce. Gone are the parking spaces, trips to corporate and sexy job titles. But that’s okay. Sometimes when we make changes we tend to evaluate them based on the very superficial things such as personnel supervised, revenue, title, and perks.

As I reconnect with friends who had known me from my previous “very important jobs” I wondered what they thought about my new leg on the road of life. It was immediately obvious. They couldn’t have been happier. We were all once awash in the sea of corporate bureaucracy, but now they see that I am on solid footing. I get to make my own decisions, donate money to worthy causes, and speak out without fear of reprisal. In short, they say, I’ve finally found exactly what I’m supposed to be doing. They told me they can see it in me.  And that has been the most astonishingly tremendous aspect of coming home.

 

07
Sep
11

not all who wander are lost

When I was young I had a passion for writing. I was told I was good at it. It came naturally and I enjoyed it. When it came time for college, I went the engineering route because that’s where the money and jobs were. Being a creative person in a technical field definitely had its advantages. The ability to write and communicate was always in demand so I felt actualized on both sides of the brain. The leadership training I gained during my years in the Air Force was also a plus. Looking back, even though it wasn’t my most authentic self, it was still a pretty good self, and I worked hard at each job.

When I got my first dog, Mr. Blue, I was intent on socializing him. So I signed him up to go to a tremendous doggie daycare, DogBoy’s Dog Ranch, in Austin, Texas. For four years he romped through the fields learning how to play and be a joyful canine. I’d drop him off and he’d race into the pen to join his friends. I wished, each and every time, that I could run into the area with them and spend the entire day playing rather than going to my J.O.B. But could I pay the bills hanging out with dogs all day and sharing all the amazing things we can learn from them?

Fast forward ten years. As part of my journey, I wound up back home in Pennsylvania running Tremendous Life Books, the premier publisher of motivational and leadership material. I can’t say it was planned, but I’ve always subscribed to the mantra, “Not all who wander are lost.” I’ve never been one to pass by an open door. As Yogi Berra so famously said, “When you come to a fork in the road, take it.”

So now I am a writer. And I get to bring my dog (now dogs!), to work every day. And my dog wrote a book. And we’re going on a six-city book “pawtograph” tour. And I get to give speeches with my dog about leadership and our various journeys throughout life. Had I not had all those “detours”, I wouldn’t have much to share. Sure I could go on and on about how much I love my dog, but so could every dog parent.

So in the end, despite all the wandering and forks in the road, I wound up exactly where I am supposed to be with my best friend by my side! All those previous industries and experiences helped me discover the most authentic version of myself. Best of all, I get to spend my entire time focused on the things in life that matter most to me, and make enough money not only to pay the bills, and to give back to some tremendous organizations.

I’m finally running and playing in the field where I was meant to be.




Tremendous Tracey


CEO Tremendous Life Books. Book Evangelist

Join Me On:

February 2020
M T W T F S S
« Jul    
 12
3456789
10111213141516
17181920212223
242526272829  

%d bloggers like this: